BREAKING: Taiwan Elects Its First Female President As Tsai Ing-wen Wins By...

BREAKING: Taiwan Elects Its First Female President As Tsai Ing-wen Wins By Landslide

By CNN on January 16, 2016
0
In this Jan. 14, 2012 file photo, Tsai Ing-wen, presidential candidate of Taiwanese opposition Democratic Progressive Party speaks to reporters in New Taipei City, Taiwan. Taiwan’s opposition presidential candidate will look to reassure U.S. officials this week that victory in a January election for her party, which Beijing views with suspicion, won’t revive tensions across the Taiwan Strait. | AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying, File

Taiwan appears to have its first female President, in a landmark election that could unsettle relations with Beijing.

Eric Chu, the Nationalist Party candidate in Taiwan’s presidential election conceded defeat late Saturday and congratulated rival Tsai Ing-wen to her victory as the country’s new President, state-run Central News Agency reported.

Her supporters filled streets, waving party banners and cheering to victory announcements made from a stage.

Official election results have not yet been announced.

Voters lined up Saturday at polling stations, and when they closed, surveys suggested that Tsai Ing-wen, leader of the opposition Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), would win the presidential vote by a significant margin after eight years under the government of the pro-China Kuomintang (KMT) or Nationalist Party.

The ruling party was also in danger of losing control of the legislature for the first time in parliamentary elections, with a record 556 candidates in the race for 113 seats.

The DPP has traditionally leaned in favor of independence for the island from mainland China, which could anger Beijing, which views Taiwan as an integral part of its territory that is to be taken by force if necessary. Beijing has missiles pointed at the island.

“I voted for DPP, because it’s very critical time for the Taiwan people. We have our own democracy systems, we will not be influenced by China,” said Tsai Cheng-an, a 55-year-old Taipei professor.

The KMT forged closer ties with China under President Ma Ying-jeou, which recently drew street protests. The new president will take over from Ma, who will step down on May 20 after serving two four-year terms.

China and Taiwan — officially the People’s Republic of China and the Republic of China — separated in 1949 following the Communist victory on the mainland in the civil war.

Read More

NO COMMENTS

Leave a Comment

To leave a comment anonymously, simple write your thoughts in the comments box below and click the ‘post comment’ button.